Plants & Flowers – All around the house http://allaroundthe.house for all your home needs Sat, 26 May 2018 16:22:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.6 https://i1.wp.com/allaroundthe.house/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/cropped-AllaroundtheHouse-1-2.jpg?fit=32%2C32 Plants & Flowers – All around the house http://allaroundthe.house 32 32 129978467 Peperomia Plant http://allaroundthe.house/peperomia-plant/ http://allaroundthe.house/peperomia-plant/#comments Thu, 04 Jan 2018 17:28:47 +0000 http://allaroundthe.house/?p=2982 Peperomia Plant perfect for home and office

The very popular peperomia plant is a great choice to add color to any room or office. Whether you have one peperomia plant or several grouped together, this attractive plant will brighten up any room. There are over 1,000 species of peperomias growing throughout North and South America and the Caribbean. All of them are […]

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Peperomia Plant perfect for home and office

The very popular peperomia plant is a great choice to add color to any room or office. Whether you have one peperomia plant or several grouped together, this attractive plant will brighten up any room.
There are over 1,000 species of peperomias growing throughout North and South America and the Caribbean. All of them are tropical plants and considered to be semisucculents. They have thick, juicy stems and leaves that hold water in reserve. Besides being attractive plants, peperomias make a nice gift to anyone with marginal green thumbs because they’re so easy to grow. Basically, the only way to kill this plant is by overwatering it.

Basic Description of Peperomias

Peperomias are slow-growing tropical plants that are found on tropical floors or at the base of trees in a tropical forest. For this reason, they don’t like direct sun and thrive indoors in a variety of lighting. They actually thrive under fluorescent lights which makes them an ideal candidate for the office.

The attractive stiff, waxy succulent-like leaves will catch your eye and depending on the species, the leaves may be variegated, wrinkled, or white-edged. There’s one species, the Peperomia argyreia that is striped and looks like a watermelon. It’s very attractive but can be hard to find.

Most peperomias do not flower in the traditional sense. Their flowers are a long, rat-tail like stem with tiny greenish flowers on an upright spike. Once this spike dies, remove it and the plant may bloom a second time during the summer months.

 

Types of Peperomias

There’s 3 different types of peperomias; bushy, upright, and trailing.

Peperomias are great for indoor air cleaning
Bushy Peperomia

Bushy Peperomias: The bushy peperomias are the most popular variety. They generally grow 4-8 inches high and are very compact. They have a variety of leaf shapes and are very attractive all by themselves. The most popular is the wrinkle-leafed Peperomia caperata and I’m sure you’ve seen these in homes or garden nurseries. There’s a stunning white-edged Peperomia caperata variegata and the Peperomia argyreia, or watermelon peperomia has striped leaves that look like watermelons.

 

 

A good peperomia will brighten your office
Upright Peperomia

Upright Peperomias : These plants are usually between 5-8 inches tall and have more distinct thick stems than the bushy peperomias. The Peperomia magnoliaefolia variegata is the most popular of this group. If you have one of these and plant it with the solid green Peperomia magnoliaefolia it will make an extremely attractive dish garden. If you can find the uncommon Peperomia verticillata, or also known as the whorled peperomia, you’ll have an attractive conversational piece. This plant has a 1 ft. stem and whorls of leaves. It’s quite different and very tropical looking.

 

 

A trailing peperomia is perfect for a hanging basket in a home office
Trailing Peperomia

Trailing Peperomias : There are several varieties and they look great trailing near a kitchen or office window. The Peperomia rotundifolia is the most common with small round one-third inch leaves that are solid green and fleshy-looking. The cupid peperomia or Peperomia scandens variegata has a variegated leaf that is pointed on long 3-4 ft. stems. This plant can actually be used as an indoor climber with a trellis. It looks great on a trellis in a corner. The creeping peperomia, Peperomia prostrata has a striking green leaf that is marked with silver or cream tones. The leaves are small one-third inch ovals on long red stems. This is quite a colorful plant especially in the office.

 

Caring For Peperomias

Without a doubt, peperomia care is very easy. Peperomias can live in a variety of light situations from low to very bright. They do not like direct sunlight. High heat is not a problem with this plant and average home temperatures are fine. Surprisingly, they do not need high humidity or constant misting to live. They are just fine with an occasional misting during the summer months and low humidity.

As with all succulents, peperomias do not like to be repotted frequently. They are slow growers and you’ll probably repot them only once or twice in their lifetime. They live practically forever which is another reason why they’re an ideal houseplant. When you do have to repot them, peperomias prefer a peat-based soil or regular potting soil with good drainage.

The quickest way to kill these plants is by overwatering. Peperomias retain water in their leaves and stems so don’t water them until they are nearly dry. After you water them, wait an hour and empty any residual water out from the base. These plants need to be fertilized about once every 3-4 months in spring and summer and no fertilizing during the winter months.

 

Peperomias are a great choice for an indoor plant and are easily available at most nurseries and florists.

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Hardy Orchids Grow Well Planted in a Perennial Shade Garden http://allaroundthe.house/hardy-orchids-grow-well-planted-perennial-shade-garden/ http://allaroundthe.house/hardy-orchids-grow-well-planted-perennial-shade-garden/#comments Sun, 10 Dec 2017 15:04:06 +0000 http://allaroundthe.house/?p=2892

Bletilla to Spiranthes, hardy orchids grow well in woodland gardens. Shade-loving perennials like hosta, foamflower and Solomon’s seal are good mixers. Gardeners, looking for a challenging plant, will find it among some orchids tough enough for outdoors. Able to thrive in environments where cold winters are the norm, gardeners who grow indoor orchids will easily […]

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Bletilla to Spiranthes, hardy orchids grow well in woodland gardens. Shade-loving perennials like hosta, foamflower and Solomon’s seal are good mixers.

Gardeners, looking for a challenging plant, will find it among some orchids tough enough for outdoors. Able to thrive in environments where cold winters are the norm, gardeners who grow indoor orchids will easily recognize the beloved flower forms. Gardeners can turn to Bletilla, Calanthe, Cypripedium or Spiranthes for inspiration, both in species plants and hybrid cultivars.

hardy orchids are great for landscapingHardy orchids are not for the faint-of-heart gardener but those who love plants have found success growing them as natives among a wildflower planting, in a shaded garden or as a cherished, and protected, specimen plant. Gardeners will want a well thought-out site, taking into account the expense, when choosing where to plant these woodland perennials.

Spring Blooming Ground Orchid Bletilla

Bletilla striata, called the Chinese ground orchid, is hardy in zones 5 – 9. As its name implies, Bletialla is a native of China and Japan. Issuing up from the center of the plant, the long leafless stems are lined with quintessential orchid blooms flourishing in spring. The foliage in mass, which reaches approximately 12” – 24” tall and wide, looks like swords of grass but more papery than the leaves of bearded iris, for instance.

Check out this post to learn about 9 great shade plants to add color and beauty

Although Bletilla striata may tolerate a full sun location in a northern garden, a partly shaded planting bed is best for plants to thrive long term. The soil should be well amended with organic matter if a humus texture is missing. Mulch is wise to use for protection against drought conditions in summer and freezing temperatures in winter.

Old and new Bletilla striata cultivars include:

  • B. ‘Albostriata’ has a strip of white edging the margins along the leaves. The flowers are the usual purple color.
  • B. ‘Alba’ has white flowers.
  • B. ‘Big Bob’ has lavender sepals and petals but the lip has a hint of white.

Bletilla striata grows from pseudobulbs. Like other hardy orchids, more plants can be had by digging up and dividing the plants or, in this case, dividing the bulbs. Overwintering and growing the bulbs indoors as a houseplant is another way of saving these orchids until the next spring.

best orchids for shade gardensCalanthe Hardy Yellow Orchid

Calanthe is another hardy orchid genus from which to choose. Calanthe discolor and Calanthe sieboldii, a hardy yellow orchid, is limited to zones 7 – 9. Gardeners who wish to push the boundaries of hardiness will consider late spring frosts their enemy; something to guard against.

Calanthe orchids have very vertical racemes, up to 15” tall, on a plant whose leaves are more oblong than narrow. This hardy orchid likes shade in a wooded environment and makes good companion plantings for blue hosta and Solomon’s seal perennials.

Cypripedium Called Lady’s Slipper Orchid

Cypripedium, called lady’s slipper, is an orchid with a hardiness range of 2 – 7. Cypripedium has species native to southern areas of eastern North America, making it ideal for woodland wildflower gardens. This orchid plant benefits from leaf mold mulch under a canopy of trees and prefers acidic soils.

The Cypripedium plant grows up to 24” tall with leaves that have an accordion appearance resulting from the vertical veining. Each spring flower is made up of three petals and an exaggerated lip called the pouch, also an iconic feature of many orchid species.

Fall Blooming Spiranthes Chadds Ford

Spiranthes cernua is a fall blooming hardy orchid, which is more reliable for northern gardeners. The native orchid ranges from Canada to the southeastern United States, from zones 4 – 8. The common name is ladies tresses and has a fragrant flower.

Spiranthes cernua f. odoratea ‘Chadds Ford’ was rescued in the 1960s in Bear, Delaware, that since has been bred into cultivation. The hardiness range, distinctive flower spike and native plant distinction makes Spiranthes cernua f. oderatea ‘Chadds Ford’ a good choice for native gardeners looking for autumn flowers.

Orchids grow great in shadeProtecting Wild and Hybrid Orchids

Protecting the hardy orchid should be part of a maintenance care plan, first consider the site of the planting bed. Culprits that threaten orchids outside can come in the form of two-legged Homo-sapiens or four-legged mammals, as well as insects who want to feast on the succulent plant.

Hardy orchids can be sited as a specimen plant in a private garden to keep it safe from theft or as a collection surrounded by less favored plants to deter wildlife. Slugs like orchids outside, as well as hostas, so use strategies to dissuade slugs from chewing up the foliage.

Although there is an increase in hybridizing orchids, the cost of a hardy orchid is still prohibitive for many. Plant lovers know it is no less dangerous for wild orchids threatened in the native plant world so gardeners must recognize they are the orchids’ first line of defense, by not creating a market for species harvested from the wild.

Check out this post to learn more about plants to grow in a shade garden

Shady Loving Perennial Plants with Outdoor Orchids

Gardeners can successfully grow orchids outdoors as long as the correct habitat is provided. Whether a species or hybrid plant, the hardy orchid makes an excellent singular choice for the north side of a building or several planted among like-minded shade-loving plants.

Tiarella, Heuchera and Lilium Martagon perennials and woodland ferns are more plants that, combined with hardy orchids, will grow to make an interesting landscape.

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NASTURTIUMS http://allaroundthe.house/nasturtiums/ http://allaroundthe.house/nasturtiums/#comments Mon, 04 Dec 2017 16:47:29 +0000 http://allaroundthe.house/?p=2561

Some plants like to be pampered. Others prefer a hands-off approach. Nasturtiums thrive on neglect. Just give them a sunny spot in poor, dry soil.   These vivacious plants feel at home in hot color gardens. Numerous yellow, orange, and red flowering varieties are available. For other color schemes, soft pastels are available. In the […]

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Some plants like to be pampered. Others prefer a hands-off approach. Nasturtiums thrive on neglect. Just give them a sunny spot in poor, dry soil.

 

These vivacious plants feel at home in hot color gardens. Numerous yellow, orange, and red flowering varieties are available. For other color schemes, soft pastels are available.

In the landscape, nasturtiums have many uses. They’re valuable additions to flower beds and borders. When you’re creating your container plantings, include some nasturtiums. These jewels of summer always look their best. Even when they aren’t in bloom, the intriguing bluish-green foliage can add a spark of interest to any planting.

Bird lovers everywhere will be pleased to know that nasturtiums attract hummingbirds.

If you’re looking for plants with unusual scents, this is the one. Both the foliage and blooms have a characteristic fragrance.

This herb belongs in the edible landscape. The pungent, peppery blooms are often added to salads, and used as a colorful garnish. The seed pods are sometimes pickled as a condiment.

So far as size and growth habit are concerned, you should choose the variety that best fits your particular needs. Most nasturtiums are about a foot in height with a two foot spread. But the climbing varieties are an exception. If provided with proper support, these can be 6 feet in height.

Usually nasturtium plants are available at garden centers. I prefer to grow mine from seed, since they don’t always tolerate transplanting as well as some other annuals.

In flowerbeds and borders, direct sowing is easy to do. The same is true for containers. For mixed container gardens, I just stick the seed in the potting soil after I’ve inserted the other plants. Nasturtiums grow so quickly that they’re established in no time.

If you’re short on time, these plants are an excellent choice. They’re very undemanding, and require very little water. When you’re creating container plantings, interplant them with other drought-tolerant herbs, such as helichrysums, rosemary, and lavender.

Regarding insect and disease problems, I’ve never noticed nasturtiums are affected by these.

When it comes right down to it, nasturtiums are just plain fun to grow. That makes them very suitable for children’s gardens. Kids will find the large seed are easy to handle. This flower is fool-proof, fast growing, and quick to bloom, attributes that children will appreciate.

Though nasturtiums were originally perennials in South America, they’re usually treated as annuals, and discarded after the first frost.

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Basil – Ocimum Basilicum http://allaroundthe.house/basil/ http://allaroundthe.house/basil/#comments Sat, 25 Nov 2017 16:59:02 +0000 http://allaroundthe.house/?p=2518

One of the most popular herbs is Ocimum basilicum commonly called sweet basil. Often called the ‘king of herbs,’ basil can be grown indoors or out. Sweet basil has inch-long, oval-pointed, dark green leaves and a clove-pepperish odor and taste. Sweet basil makes a handsome, bushy small plant, growing to a foot or more indoors. […]

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One of the most popular herbs is Ocimum basilicum commonly called sweet basil. Often called the ‘king of herbs,’ basil can be grown indoors or out. Sweet basil has inch-long, oval-pointed, dark green leaves and a clove-pepperish odor and taste. Sweet basil makes a handsome, bushy small plant, growing to a foot or more indoors. A purple-leafed variety, ‘Dark Opal’ is decorative, makes a lovely houseplant, and is equally useful in cookery. Do not let basil bloom, or it will go to seed. Instead, pinch out the plant tops and they will grow into compact little bushes.

Basil is an annual and grows 12 – 24 inches (30 – 60 cm) as the height varies according to the variety. Cultivation requirements for growing basil: full sun; light, well-drained, nutrient rich, slightly acidic soil; frequent watering (don’t waterlog); will not tolerate cold; pinch off flower stalks for a longer season of leaf production.

Basil can be easily started from seed or can be brought indoors at the end of the growing season. If you are bringing basil indoors, choose the most robust plants. Before the first frost, dig them out of the garden and pot them up in fresh potting soil. Basil can also be grown in pots outdoors and treated the same way when bringing them in for winter. Check for insects and if there is an infestation, spray with a soap and water spray. Gradually reverse the hardening off process by keeping the pots out of direct sunlight for about a week. The plants will become acclimatised to the lower light conditions they will experience indoors. Bring them inside and provide the conditions they need to continue growing.

Basil requires at least five hours of sunlight a day to stay healthy and flavorful. If you are growing basil on the windowsill, turn regularly to ensure every side receives light. Don’t let basil leaves touch the cold glass. Basil grows even better under fluorescent lights in the winter. Hang the lights 6 inches (15 cm) from plants and leave lights on for 14 hours a day.

There are many cultivars of basil. Two that are particularly popular are: O. basilicum ‘Dark Opal’- only herb to win the All American Award of Excellence – can be used the same as sweet basil; O. basilicum ‘Citriodorum’- strong lemon scent – nice for tea and with chicken and fish.

In the garden, basil can be planted with tomatoes as it helps to overcome both insects and disease. Basil also repels flies and mosquitoes. In the kitchen, use basil in tomato dishes (both raw and cooked), pesto, sauces, salad dressings, soups, fish dishes, mushroom dishes, egg and rice dishes, mixed with other herbs, omelettes, pasta dishes, vegetables such as carrots, eggplant, cabbage, squash, and zucchini. Use fresh leaves in salads and add fresh leaves to vinegar and extra virgin olive oil. Basil can be used fresh, frozen, or dried. Use basil with discretion, as it is one of the few herbs that increase in flavor when heated.

 

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Chives – Allium schoenoprasum http://allaroundthe.house/chives/ Wed, 22 Nov 2017 12:37:25 +0000 http://allaroundthe.house/?p=2509 chives are perfect for landscape borders

Known as common garden chives, Allium schoenoprasum, can be grown indoors and out. Chives are rich in vitamins A and C, potassium, and calcium. They are grown for the flavour of their leaves, which is reminiscent of onion, although much milder. Both the stems and light purple flowers are used in cooking and the snipped […]

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chives are perfect for landscape borders

Known as common garden chives, Allium schoenoprasum, can be grown indoors and out. Chives are rich in vitamins A and C, potassium, and calcium. They are grown for the flavour of their leaves, which is reminiscent of onion, although much milder. Both the stems and light purple flowers are used in cooking and the snipped leaves are an addition to many dishes. Chives lose their flavour with long cooking so it is best to add them to dishes at the last minute. For chopping stems, a pair of scissors is the best tool.

Chives can be frozen or dried. They are less flavourful when dried rather that frozen, so they are best used when fresh and snipped, or snipped and frozen. In both cases sort them carefully, removing any yellowing leaves and shoots, and keep only the plump green ones. It is possible to place chives in non-iodized salt, keep them there for several weeks, remove the leaves, and then bottle the ‘chive salt’ for use in flavouring.

Chives are a perennial in the garden and grow approximately 12 inches (30 cm) tall. They are extremely easy to grow, are drought tolerant, rarely suffer from disease or pest problems, and don’t require fertilizer. Cultivation requirements for growing chives: full sun, will tolerate light shade; grow best in well-drained, organic, fertile soil; keep soil moist – use mulch, and water during periods of drought. Chives tend to get overcrowded so dig and divide every three to four years.

Chives are perfect for edible landscape borders, learn more about edible landscaping here

Chives are easily grown from seed or can be brought indoors at the end of the growing season. If you are bringing chives indoors, divide a clump, and pot up in good houseplant soil. Leave your chive plant outdoors for a month or so after the first frost to provide a short period of dormancy. Bring them indoors and provide the requirements needed for them to start growing again. To harvest, snip leaves 2 inches (5cm) from the base of the plant. Cut flower stalks off at the soil line once they have finished blooming. This prevents the plant form forming seed and keeps it more productive.

Chives require at least five to eight hours of sunlight a day. Grow them on a southern or eastern exposure to the light. If you are growing them on a windowsill, turn regularly to ensure every side receives light. If you are unable to provide this amount of light, they also grow well under fluorescent lights. Hang lights 6 inches above the plants and leave lights on for 14 hours per day.

In the garden, plant chives with carrots. They are good companion plantings for tomatoes and fruit trees. Chives or garlic planted between rows of peas or lettuce control pashas and are reported to control the incidence of aphids when planted between roses. In the kitchen, use chives in omelets, scrambled eggs, casseroles, rice, dips, gravies, butter, meat, and seafood. Chives can be added to soft cheese, salads, sandwiches, sour cream, vinegar, and bake potatoes. Chive blossoms can be used for garnishing and are particularly attractive in salads. Chive stems can be used for tying up little bundles of vegetables for appetizers.

 

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Forsythia Signals the Blossoming of Spring with Blazing Glory http://allaroundthe.house/forsythia-signals-blossoming-spring-blazing-glory/ http://allaroundthe.house/forsythia-signals-blossoming-spring-blazing-glory/#comments Wed, 08 Nov 2017 15:32:53 +0000 http://allaroundthe.house/?p=2421 sign of the spring, a blooming Forsythia

The hardiest of Forsythia species are: Forsythia Suspensa – Look for Suspensa especially to espalier as it will easily spill over walls or can be grown as an arching shrub. Forsythia Intermedia – This hardy Forsythia is an upright type and is useful as a clipped hedge or can be used in shrub masses. Forsythias […]

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sign of the spring, a blooming Forsythia

The hardiest of Forsythia species are:

  • Forsythia Suspensa – Look for Suspensa especially to espalier as it will easily spill over walls or can be grown as an arching shrub.
  • Forsythia Intermedia – This hardy Forsythia is an upright type and is useful as a clipped hedge or can be used in shrub masses.

Forsythia shows off yellow flowersForsythias By Height

Variety suggestions by height include:

  • Forsythia ‘Fiesta’: 3 feet high
  • Forsythia ‘Minigold’: 5 feet high
  • Forsythia ‘Variegata’: 6 feet high

Forsythia Sun Requirements and Zones

Forsythia grows best within zones 6 – 9 and should be planted in full sun to partial shade. It will grow in shady areas but the blooms will be limited.

Companion Plants To Forsythia

  • Azaleas
  • Sedum
  • Smoke Bush
  • Lilac

the sharp yellow Forsythia adds a splash of color to the landscapePropagating Forsythia

The branches of Forsythia can be propagated in both greenwood and hardwood form.

  • In spring, use approximately an 8 inch cutting of the greenwood and in Autumn utilize approximately the same length of the hardwood branch.
  • Insert into a deep box of sand and winter in a darkened area.
  • In spring, plant directly outdoors in beds or grow in pots.
Learn more about how to do cutting propagating over at Downtown Homestead

Forcing Forsythia

Blooms may be forced indoors by bringing branches with buds inside, placing in lukewarm water and keeping by a sunny window.

Pruning Forsythia Shrubs

Little pruning is necessary although the following steps will assure a vigorous return:

  • Thin out branches during the blooming season (usually cuttings taken for arrangements satisfies this).
  • After the Forsythia has flowered remove old or dead wood.
Check out the Pruning and Cutting Guide to understand more

should I add a Forsythia to my landscape?Forsythia Problems

Disease and problems with Forsythia are unusual but can include the following:

  • Nodular growths along the stem may indicate a bacterial issue (crown gall) that could kill the shrub. Cut off and destroy infected branches or destroy the entire plant if the nodular growths are widespread.
  • Leaf spots are not serious.
  • A fungal issue is most likely the culprit of dieback. Prune all affected branches.

Little Known Forsythia Facts

  • Forsythia in the language of flowers means “anticipation”.
  • Forsythia is native to China and for centuries has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for treatment of colds and viral infections often combined with honeysuckle flowers. Forsythia fruit is steamed and dried and is used in teas, capsule and extracts.
  • In modern Chinese medicine it is prescribed as a broad spectrum antibiotic and has no reported side effects.

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River Birches; Look Good and are Easy to Care For http://allaroundthe.house/river-birches/ Sat, 04 Nov 2017 17:19:34 +0000 http://allaroundthe.house/?p=2423 white peel bark trees

River birches (Betula nigra) are a less common or popular tree compared to many others, but that may be more by accident, than real knowledge. Ask most homeowners to describe an oak, maple, or even a hickory, and you will get a fair to good description. They will describe these as deciduous (lose leaves in […]

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white peel bark trees

River birches (Betula nigra) are a less common or popular tree compared to many others, but that may be more by accident, than real knowledge. Ask most homeowners to describe an oak, maple, or even a hickory, and you will get a fair to good description. They will describe these as deciduous (lose leaves in the fall) trees with large, lobed leaves that produce beautiful fall colors of red, orange and purples. Ask these same homeowners about river birches and they may convey a quizzical look.

River Birches are Trees of Character and Grace

river birches add elegance to your landscapingRiver birches are deciduous trees suitable for zones 4-9. They have small leaves arranged linearly off main side branches and secondary side branches. Since the leaves are small, they are not suitable for rendering dense shade. If someone needs dense shade, then oaks and maples are preferred. River birches filter sunlight quite well and provide some shade.

The trees are usually cultivated with three to five main trunks arising from a central point and have a unique look. Multiple main trunks are common with as many as 6-10 trunks, but they are typically pruned to a final 3-5 trunk number. The trees grow quickly reaching heights of 40-50 feet and upper canopy spreads of about 40 feet.

The bark of river birches is magnificent and showy. It is bright white-gray in color. As the bark matures, it peels back and away slightly to give a curled look with a salmon-red coloring (see photos below and double-click to enlarge).

Landscaping with River Birches

River birches are usually purchased as 2-3 year old young trees. Location and placement of these trees is important . Here are some important landscape thoughts.

  • River birches grow quickly, and they can span toward a house at an angle that positions them too close to your property. A minimum distance of 25-50 feet from the foundation is recommended.
  • Clustering of three river birches looks terrific and dramatic and should be considered. Space the triangular cluster about 10-20 feet apart.
  • Linear placement of river birches, also provides character and grace.
  • Proximity to a stream or river is not required. The trees do well with ordinary water availability.

Planting River Birches

these trees are beautifulRiver birches are easy to plant and care for. They are easy to maintain over the years and reward with their elegance and grace.

  • Stake locate the positions of the trees. Remember that a site at least 25-50 feet away from the house foundation is important because the trees grow quickly and become large.
  • Dig a hole that is about 25% greater than the diameter of the ball or pot of the plant.
  • Dig the hole deep enough so that it can be even or slightly below the pot depth when the tree is moved into the hole.
  • Place sufficient peat moss or planting mix soil into the base and sides of the hole and add 1-2 cups of 8-8-8 or 10-10-10 fertilizer. Mix thoroughly and spread.
  • Add the tree into the center of the hole. Transfer rapidly and keep roots moist with a watering can or hose.
  • Make sure the tree is properly positioned. Add additional soil as needed and water thoroughly.
  • Layer with mulch to maintain moisture, and water completely once or twice a week.

Maintenance and Pruning

Maintenance of the trees includes fertilization in early spring. Fertilize with a few cups of the triple 8 or 10 fertilizer that is applied in a broad circle at the far edge drip line of the tree leaf canopy, or use tree stake fertilizers.

Check out these tree pruning tips

River birches are relatively easy to maintain. Pruning includes removal of all the low side branches in late winter or very early spring. Lopping shears or bypass pruners work well. Most river birches are pruned at the side branches. Proceed upward and remove side branches each year during as they grow out from the main trunk. This is done each year up to a growing height of 6-10 feet. In this manner the trees look magnificent and elegant as shown in photos below.

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Japanese Knotweed http://allaroundthe.house/japanese-knotweed/ http://allaroundthe.house/japanese-knotweed/#comments Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:31:50 +0000 http://allaroundthe.house/?p=2328

Japanese knotweed’s elegance belies the truth it has become the scourge of home owners. It develops at an astonishing rate, is near-impossible to get rid of and has damaged home value – cleaning countless numbers off residence values. Japanese knotweed, or Fallopia Japonica, was taken to the US from Asia in the mid-19C by German-born […]

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Japanese knotweed’s elegance belies the truth it has become the scourge of home owners. It develops at an astonishing rate, is near-impossible to get rid of and has damaged home value – cleaning countless numbers off residence values. Japanese knotweed, or Fallopia Japonica, was taken to the US from Asia in the mid-19C by German-born botanist Phillipp von Siebold who thought it was increasing on the edges of volcanoes.

japanese knotweed is destructive
Japanese Knotweed growing through a brick wall, showing the destructive nature of this invasive plant.

Initially famous for its elegance and thought of as a beautiful landscaping material, and it was so recognized that in 1847 it was known as the “most exciting new decorative Plant of the year” by the Community of Farming at Utrecht in Netherlands. Fleshy red tinged shoots when it first smashes through the ground.

Check Out: Vegetation Killer Guide to learn how to kill Japanese Knotweed

Japanese knotweed has hollow stems with distinct raised nodes that give it the appearance of bamboo, though it is not related. While stems may reach a maximum height of 3–4 m (9.8–13.1 ft) each growing season, it is typical to see much smaller plants in places where they sprout through cracks in the pavement or are repeatedly cut down. The leaves can be spade shaped or broad oval with a truncated base, 7–14 cm (2.8–5.5 in) long and 5–12 cm (2.0–4.7 in) broad, with an entire margin. The flowers are small, cream or white, produced in erect racemes 6–15 cm (2.4–5.9 in) long in late summer and early autumn. The blossoms of Japanese knotweed can attract bees when it blooms in the summer.

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Dandelion http://allaroundthe.house/dandelion/ http://allaroundthe.house/dandelion/#comments Thu, 19 Oct 2017 18:29:53 +0000 http://allaroundthe.house/?p=2318

Dandelion are local to Europe and North America, but the two quite common varieties globally, T. officinale and T. erythrospermum, were presented from European countries and now distribute as wild blossoms. Both varieties are edible. The common name dandelion from France dent-de-lion, significance “lion’s tooth” is given to associates of the genus. Like other associates […]

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Dandelion are local to Europe and North America, but the two quite common varieties globally, T. officinale and T. erythrospermum, were presented from European countries and now distribute as wild blossoms. Both varieties are edible. The common name dandelion from France dent-de-lion, significance “lion’s tooth” is given to associates of the genus. Like other associates of the Asteraceae family, they have very small blossoms gathered together into a blend. Each single plant in a group is known as a floret.

Check Out: Vegetation Killer Guide to learn how to kill Dandelions

Many Dandelion varieties generate plant seeds, where to obtain seeds are created without pollination, causing in children that are genetically like the parent plant. In common, the basic foliage is 5–25 cm long or longer, simple, lobed, and like a basal rosette above the main taproot. The plant heads are yellow-colored to lemon colored, and are open during the day, but shut at night. The blossoms are carried singly on an empty stem that is usually leafless and increases 1–10 cm or more. Stems and leaves express a white-colored, milky latex when damaged. A rosette may generate several blooming stems at a time. The plant leads are 2–5 cm across and include multiple florets.

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Poison Oak http://allaroundthe.house/poison-oak/ http://allaroundthe.house/poison-oak/#comments Sun, 15 Oct 2017 15:09:09 +0000 http://allaroundthe.house/?p=2299

Commonly known as Pacific poison oak or Western Poison oak, is a woodsy vine or plant in the Anacardiaceae (sumac) family. It is allocated in western Northern America, inhabiting conifer and combined broadleaf forests, grasslands, and chaparral biomes. Optimum blooming only happens in May. Like other members of the Toxicodendron genus, T. diversilobum causes itchiness […]

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Commonly known as Pacific poison oak or Western Poison oak, is a woodsy vine or plant in the Anacardiaceae (sumac) family. It is allocated in western Northern America, inhabiting conifer and combined broadleaf forests, grasslands, and chaparral biomes. Optimum blooming only happens in May. Like other members of the Toxicodendron genus, T. diversilobum causes itchiness and sensitive rashes in many people after contact by touch or breathing.

Check Out: Vegetation Killer Guide to learn how to kill Poison Oak

Toxicodendron diversilobum is extremely varying in growth and foliage overall look. It develops as a heavy 0.5–4 m (1.6–13.1 ft) high Plant in open sunshine, a treelike grape vine 10–30 feet (3.0–9.1 m) and may be more than 100 feet (30 m) long with an 8–20 cm (3.1–7.9 in) footprint, as heavy thickets in shady areas, or any form in between It reproduces by growing rhizomes and by seeds. The plant is winter deciduous, so that after cold temperature sets in, the vines are leafless and keep only the casual group of fruits. Without leaves the stems may sometimes be recognized by periodic black spots where its milky sap may have oozed and dried. Poison oak is typical in various environments, from mesic riparian areas to xeric chaparral. It grows in sketchy and dappled mild through complete and sunshine circumstances, at heights below 5,000 legs (1,500 m). The vining type can ascend huge plant and shrub trunks into the canopy.

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